What an ideal university student’s room looks like
What an ideal university student’s room looks like
What an ideal university student's room looks like.

A university student’s room should suit their needs and their new lifestyle. It should be both well-designed in terms of space and useful areas, and well equipped with a comfortable bed and a study area.

University students spend a lot of time in their rooms. Resting, doing homework, studying… That’s why it’s important that they have a comfortable and pleasant room.

If you are thinking of renting a room in a student residence, we will tell you what it should be like for you to enjoy a good stay. Take note of the following points:

Comfortable, good-sized bed

The bed is the centre of the room and the most important thing. First of all, your room should have a comfortable and well-maintained mattress. You should not feel springs in your back or parts that are deeper than others, as you might wake up with back pain.

Secondly, the bed should be of a size that allows you to move around at night without making you feel like you’re going to fall out. It is better to opt for a wide bed, otherwise you could limit your movement and be uncomfortable.

Finally, we advise you to pay attention to the quality of the bedding. If your accommodation claims to include sheets and bedding, make sure they are soft.

Study area

This is one of the must-haves in student rooms. University students spend a lot of time on their laptops; studying or doing research and homework. So, ideally, they should have a space to rest your laptop and sit comfortably.

A study area should have a large desk and a comfortable chair that supports your back and adjusts to your height. This area is usually located in a corner of the room, a few steps away from the bed.

This is also where you can keep your books and university materials. It will also serve as a support table for you to make models and do all kinds of university work without leaving the comfort of your room.

Good lighting

Lighting is another essential aspect of university rooms. It is best to have a lamp on your desk to illuminate what you are working on or the book you are reading. This is very useful when it gets dark and the main lights in the room are not as bright as you would like them to be.

Similarly, it’s good to have another lamp on your bedside table, next to your bed. When you’re lying down and need to illuminate something, you won’t have to get up to turn on the main lights. By simply reaching out and pressing a button, you can have quick, effective and more comfortable lighting.

Suitable colours

Rooms should convey a sense of calm, especially for a university student. Avoid those rooms with brightly coloured walls. Why? Because they are distracting colours that keep your brain alert.

That will be terrible when you need to concentrate to study or read a text, as well as when you need to sleep or take a break in the afternoon. Preferably, choose rooms with relaxing wall colours such as white, beige, grey, blue or lilac. All in their lightest shades.

Windows and natural light

There’s nothing like opening the blinds in the morning and letting natural light into the room. It’s an aspect that will help your mental health, as sunlight transmits energy and mood.

Moreover, it is beneficial for your circadian rhythm. By simply receiving or seeing sunlight, your body will know when it is time to wake up or go to sleep unconsciously. This will help you sleep better and wake up more easily the next day.

Avoid rooms without windows, as they force you to rely on artificial light. They also create a feeling of confinement and reduce air circulation.

Total darkness blinds

Just as it is important to be able to let in sunlight, it is essential to be able to cover it when necessary.

For that, your bedroom should have total darkness blinds. They will help you stay asleep by keeping out any light during the night, as well as sunlight at dawn.

With these basics in mind, you will be able to choose the best room to enjoy as a university student.

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